Roy, Anindo

Roy, Anindo
Associate Professor, Neurology
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Fischell Department of Bioengineering
Baltimore VAMC, Annex, 209 / 209 W Fayette St, Suite 214, Baltimore, MD
410-637-3241
410-605-7913
Research Interests 
In collaboration with senior UMB-SOM, UMROI and MERCE investigators, Drs. Macko and Forrester, Dr. Roy’s current research trajectory is moving towards the following projects that by no means, are all inclusive: Modification to the established event-triggered, gait sub-task, deficit adjusted adaptive control system for using the Anklebot to train more ecological activities of daily life (ADL) mobility functions including over ground gait, staircase ascend/descend, controlled turns and navigation, balance tasks, among others; Development of the next-generation of co-operative neuro-robotics with Artificial Intelligence (AI) machine learning-based adaptive controllers that will be capable of intelligently interacting with the human and environment to optimize neuro-motor and functional recovery in stroke. These controllers are based on a unique neuro-motor input-multiple output (NIMO) model that utilizes real-time human performance to auto-adjust training inputs including task difficulty and Anklebot support; Development of portable, battery operated untethered Anklebot module that is lightweight using smart material alloys; Development of portable smart vision systems integrated into the Anklebot (“Anklebot with eyes”) to facilitate deployment of a portable biomechanics lab into the community.
Background Info 

Dr. Anindo Roy is an Associate Professor of Neurology in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Director of the Technology Core, Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research & Development (VA RR&D) Maryland Exercise and Robotics Center of Excellence (MERCE), and Faculty at the Maryland Robotics Center and in the Office of Advanced Engineering Education (OAEE) at the University of Maryland at College Park. Prior to his current positions, Dr. Roy held prestigious postdoctoral fellowships at Georgia Institute of Technology and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  Dr. Roy conducts research in rehabilitation robotics, specifically in the development and clinical testing of ankle robotic technology for rehabilitation of gait and mobility function in neurologically disabled populations. Since assuming his current position in 2009, his work has included development of novel Anklebot-assisted seated training interventions as well as control algorithms for treadmill-based and over ground locomotor training.

Dr. Roy’s overarching research interests are twofold: first, to better understand the neuro-mechanics of pathological human gait and second, to develop and implement novel lower extremity (LE) robotic technology for rehabilitation of gait and mobility function in neurologically disabled populations. Over the past six years, he has spearheaded the engineering development and clinical evaluation of the world’s 1st impedance-controlled ankle robot module. His research at MERCE has demonstrated that performance-based, progressive seated Anklebot training improves paretic ankle motor control and reduces ankle impairment that lead to gains in key elements of overground gait function, in both chronic and early sub-acute stroke.

Dr. Roy’s present research focuses on a number of pre-clinical engineering research directions:

  • development and clinical testing of a novel event-triggered, gait sub-task, deficit adjusted adaptive control system for using the Anklebot for TM-based gait training in chronic stroke. His unique control approach has successfully linked robotic support to specific functional deficits of hemiparetic gait in a manner that prevents destabilization and enables customized therapy to individual gait deficit profiles and calibration with motor learning across intervention, allowing intelligent robots to teach the central nervous system to durably learn/re-learn motor tasks;
  • using the adaptive control system to train more ecological activities of daily life (ADL) mobility functions including Anklebot-assisted over ground gait, staircase ascend/descend, controlled turns and navigation, balance tasks, among others;
  • development of the next-generation of co-operative neuro-robotics with Artificial Intelligence (AI) machine learning-based adaptive controllers that will be capable of intelligently interacting with the human and environment to optimize neuro-motor and functional recovery in stroke;
  • development of portable, battery operated untethered Anklebot module that is lightweight using smart material alloys. These engineering advances will, in the near future, create a “robotic gym” and provide clinicians and therapists a “suite” of task-specific adaptive controllers that enable and facilitate human-robot cooperative learning of specific functional ADL mobility tasks.

Dr. Roy has published more than forty scientific articles in high-impact peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings, and book chapters in a wide range of areas including human biomechanics, biological control systems, rehabilitation robotics, neurophysiology, and neurorehabilitation. Dr. Roy’s research has been widely reported in the media, both print and television, including the VA Research Currents, Yahoo News, Baltimore’s Fox 45 news, to name a few.

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